May 18 - As rumours about Sebastian Vettel's future continue, the quadruple world champion has received another alternative job offer.

The 34-year-old German, who is undecided about signing another contract with Aston Martin beyond 2022, has already been invited to test an Indycar and work alongside F1 legend Gerhard Berger in the German DTM series.

Now, Thomas Chevaucher, boss of the DS Techeetah team, is inviting Vettel to Formula E.

The French team has won the all-electric series twice, and runs former Red Bull F1 driver Jean-Eric Vergne.

"Sebastian is very interested in environmental protection and has climate change in mind, just like we do in Formula E," Chevaucher told Auto Bild.

"We do not know to what extent he is interested in continuing his career in Formula E, but we would like to give him the opportunity to try out a CO2-neutral racing car."


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35 F1 Fan comments on “Vettel now also invited to test Formula E car

    • Kris G

      At least in the UK coal plants haven't been used unless needed as backup. To date 37% of the energy generated comes from renewable sources.

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  1. ReallyOldRacer

    I'm too intellectually lazy to do it myself but I would love to see a complete environmental cost/ benefit analysis, ev vs fossil. Manufacture, storage, road weight, maintenance, power grid load, disposal.....I'm no engineer but I'm guessing close to equality.

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      • ReallyOldRacer

        One other thing. We in many areas of the US have power outages due to load. How the hell are we gonna' charge these mothers to get to work with no power? I can hear the employee excuses now. And, as Swede said, where does the electricity come from? Most of the west is losing hydro-electric feeds, Texas is a disaster, the northeast is always a challenge and those regions are huge population bases. OK, that's my US rant for the day.

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          • ReallyOldRacer

            Maybe later. For now they are very inefficient and expensive, and you still have the other battery issues. I'm no engineer but why are we not exploring hydrogen power? Oh well, as you said, this is a F1 site. Here comes Spain. Habla espanol?

          • Susan

            Solar panels only work where there is sunlight most of the day, and only on houses, Blo. Takes about 5 years to break even. The US is always looking for the new miracle pill. EV cars with lithium batteries that are not rechargeable, not recyclable, lithium mining is an environmental disaster, and only last 10 years. Windmills that kill birds on a daily basis, blades again not recyclable and only work if enough sustainable wind is available. The West Is trying up, forget about hydroelectric.

          • ReallyOldRacer

            Good synopsis, Susan. That leaves H, most plentiful element on the planet. Biggest challenge is to eliminate methane in its commercial production One thing for sure, we must find a way to sustain our existence without destroying our existence.. Requires better minds than mine.

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          • Blo

            Simples, birth control. All the advantages, highly effective, no cost and can be left to the higher intellect of the female population.

    • John B

      The cost of recycling and disposal of the heavy metals in the batteries 🔋 is huge for a product that has a projected lifetime of 8 years

      Don't end up in water as the batteries may explode

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  2. shroppyfly

    Who can we blame for bybrids and electric cars, maybe toyota , werent they the first out with the prius, I couldnt agree more Ror Hydrogen will be the next fuel, Honda and Hyundai proved it can be done, infrastructure allready there , just the tech to extract enough H to make it viable .In uk theres a fleet of buses running in the west midlands on H now, and JCB are going fully H i think?

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    • Swede

      Takes a lot of energy to create Hydrogen, so it's not the panacea that the dreamers dream of. Solar never pays off either.

      Hydro is a great source, but many,hydro plants being shutdown now.

      By the way, I am a Mechanical Engineer, and I can't understand the reluctance to use Tidal power. There are a few in the northern regioins, but it is huge, extremely reluable, never ending resource.

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      • Shroppyfly

        Respect your qualification but I'm sure they said the same about the prius and 25yrs later every Mfr doing electric, the step to H would take a lot less time imo

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        • Swede

          Prius... have you seen one lately? Uh, no? There is a reason.

          Battery cars are fine if you only want to drive short distances. Been around for over 100 years, so not new at all.

          And now, no thought for how to deal with the leftover batteries. Lithium Ion batteries are a mess. At least Lead Acid batteries are recycled for their Lead (and acid).

          The majority (95%+) of Hydrogen is produced by natural gas, oil and coal burning plants, by extracting from natural gas in a process that requires a lot of energy and emits vast amounts of carbon dioxide. Producing natural gas also releases methane, a particularly potent greenhouse gas.

          Hydrogen fue cells require nearly as much energy to produce Hydrogen as they deliver, so not viable.

          Or if using Hydrogen fuel stations there is safety issue in storage and distribution due to the volatility of Hydrogen, which combusts with one-tenth the energy required for gasoline.

          H is a nice dream, but not a solution for general use.

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          • shroppyfly

            Thats absolutely fine and i agree "Today" BUT

            The Germans run a hydrogen train in public use

            JCB probably the best at what they build sorry USA lol, have a hydrogen digger nearly ready for production

            And in UK
            144 hydrogen buses on the streets of the west mids, largest fleet in the world

            Yes Honda gave it up , but it does seem like theirs enough firms trying it, if not today then who knows in 10-15yrs time ?

    • Susan

      Electric cars have been around since the beginning of the last century. Wasn’t viable then, not viable now. Europe has a more practical solution with mass transit. Unfortunately, we American are addicted to our cars. Myself, European cars, Porsche, Mercedes and a Volvo

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      • ReallyOldRacer

        A Volvo.... a Volvo, Susan? I have lost all respect for your future posts. LOL As for US vs EUR use of mass transpo. A bit of an excuse. The US is mostly spread out all over the place. We do use it when practical. IE New York City where car ownership is somewhere between 35-45% compared to 95% in the entire country. Now, back to that Volvo. :)

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        • Swede

          Volvo... practical, dirt cheap used and oh so safe. It is Swedish of course, but thats all the good I have to say, except that the turbo Volvos are actually quite fast...

          Bet its a wagon too. For carting the little bugger pickers to soccer I would guess. ;-)

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          • Susan

            It’s okay ROR. IIt’s my husband’s car. The other two are mine. Please don’t be upset with me. I live Volvos, I just like Porsche and Mercedes better.

          • Susan

            Well, our Volvos were new and we drove them into the ground. My husbands sedan is a turbo. Quite peppy. We’ve had both wagons and sedans. My bugger pickers didn’t play soccer.

          • Swede

            Hubby's volvo?

            And you posting on an F1 board.

            What do you and hubby identify as? ;-)

            By the way - my wife has 2 motorcycles. :-)

        • Susan

          It’s okay ROR. IIt’s my husband’s car. The other two are mine. Please don’t be upset with me. I live Volvos, I just like Porsche and Mercedes better.

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  3. shroppyfly

    This off gooogle

    In 2018, California mandated that new single-family homes, as well as multi-family dwellings up to three stories high, must include solar panels starting in 2020. A second mandate was also voted into law, requiring new commercial buildings to have solar panels and battery storage as well.22 Feb 2022

    The wind turbine blades " can " be recycled, however the cost is a little prohibitive but a fair few US companies are doing it apparently .

    Sounds like im p888ing on Susans parade a bit but Im not lol

    And so back to H for the cars, a virtually unending source of energy..a no brainer for me, either that or Batteries rule the world

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    • ReallyOldRacer

      Shrop', by extension, if batteries rule the world then electricity rules the world. Where is all that juice gonna' come from? How much fossil to build those buggers? How do we dispose of them? Justify the road destruction from the increased vehicle weight. So now the US taxpayers are going to pay for 30,000 charging stations. The list goes on. Swede, I guess, makes good points re H, but we need solutions from better minds than mine. OK, I'm done with this string except to wonder if Susan's Volvo is that oh so attractive mustard color. Time to go racing!

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    • Susan

      Shroppfly, I wouldn’t use California as the gold standard. That state lives in a parallel universe. The state is broke and social issues too many to mention. 3/4 of the state have more moderate to conservative views but are ruled by the minority of whack jobs on the coast where the serious money is. Our politicians use mandates to get what the want because the voters wouldn’t approve if given the opportunity. Mandates are not laws here just politicians who abuse the powers. I know California, I was born and raised there.

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      • Shroppyfly

        Very interesting stuff, good to get a member of the public view on energy very slow take up of solar here too since Gov cut the tariffs, I have panels on my roof which were frèe from a company they generate I think max 4Kw per day which is ok.. as long as I use as it produces, there's no storage etc and if I don't use it, it's fed back to the company who then sell it on for £ it's an ok deal from April to September reduces my electric bill by 30-40%
        Downside is the homeowner has to have
        there panels on the roof for 25yrs

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    • Susan

      Shroppfly, I wouldn’t use California as the gold standard. That state lives in a parallel universe. The state is broke and social issues too many to mention. 3/4 of the state have more moderate to conservative views but are ruled by the minority of whack jobs on the coast where the serious money is. Our politicians use mandates to get what the want because the voters wouldn’t approve if given the opportunity. Mandates are not laws here just politicians who abuse the powers. I know California, I was born and raised there.
      My brother lives there and has since he was born, he doesn’t have solar panels on his 2 story house not water for that matter.

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    • Susan

      Shroppfly, I wouldn’t use California as the gold standard. That state lives in a parallel universe. The state is broke and social issues too many to mention. 3/4 of the state have more moderate to conservative views but are ruled by the minority of whack jobs on the coast where the serious money is. Our politicians use mandates to get what the want because the voters wouldn’t approve if given the opportunity. Mandates are not laws here just politicians who abuse the powers. I know California, I was born and raised there.
      My brother lives there and has since he was born, he doesn’t have solar panels on his 2 story house not water for that matter.

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